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RELAX DUDE…

Relaxation is often directly linked to FEAR. But not the biology of fear – the ‘psychology’ of fear (how you think about fear and the thoughts it pollutes your mind with). You need to define what you fear.  Then you need to address those fears.  This process will lead to what I refer to as ‘relative relaxation’.

Royce Gracie, was a master at this.  No matter what he felt or thought, no matter if he was dehydrated, exhausted or bruised, he maintained a focused warrior’s demeanor.  For the purpose of this discussion, he stayed relaxed.  And that is what allowed him to dominate his UFC matches.  He trusted himself and his system. Anderson Silva embodies this trait.

How does this relate to fear?  In a controlled match, when you know what the other guy can do and if you are prepared for that, then you can relax and play chess.  (The fight game is like chess with muscles at 100 mph.)   This preparation provides you with a level of assurance & comfort that equals confidence. On the physical level, when you know the assets and liabilities of the opposition and you intelligently work on the counters, jams, Murphy plugs, then you can relax.

“The difference between to professional and the amateur is defense”

An old boxing maxim

Remember, anyone can go on the offensive; it takes will & skill to be able to protect yourself and fight back.

But to truly excel, you need to move past the physical.  So when someone is teaching you physical stuff or you’re practicing a new or improved approach, remember this slogan: JUST SAY KNOW.  Often we practice through imitation, but much more can be learned and used faster when you really understand, really KNOW what and why you’re doing something.

So ‘relaxation’ is an interesting concept, because it deals with three distinct realms that influence or impact one another.  To further complicate things, these arsenals are not well defined by most martial practitioners and are therefore often misunderstood.

For example, lets look at relaxation as it pertains to the groundfight:

1. physical tension (i.e. you exhaust yourself too quickly)

2. mental tension (you can’t think clearly or remember what you’ve practiced).

Tiring physically is about endurance and stamina, hyperventilating has to do more with your aerobic/anaerobic system and drawing a blank is of course related to your mental arsenal.

Then, perhaps the most important question is, “Is this a grappling match or a groundfight? ” I’m not sure anyone could (or should) relax in a real groundfight (with the threat of concrete, concealed weapons, improvised weapons, multiple assailants, etc., you’d want to get up ASAP and check your back.)

Analyzing and including these principles in your training sessions and de-briefs following a great workout with help you train with more direction.  The more you understand…the more confidence you have, which in turn affects your self-control.  This all leads to relative relaxation, which is the best we can hope for.

Check out this video on mind-set, fear, combat psychology I did for Jiu Jitsu Mania

Remember: “The mind navigates the body”.

If you want more on fear & mind-set check out our DVDs: Advanced Behavioral Concepts & our best-selling audio trilogy, The Mental Edge.

Train hard & Stay Safe!

Tony

 

 

One Response to RELAX DUDE…

  1. Bob Bello says:

    When I was a full contact kick boxer my trainer would always have us focus on our opponent and what we were going to do in the fight. A lot of time on visualization. By the time the fight came around we were convinced no one could beat us. Was I still nervous and maybe fearful getting into the ring yes. But I could control that fear and it was much less of a problem. I was confident in my ability and that made a huge difference. Maybe by visualizing certain scenarios concerning attacks against us it could have the same outcome. We could then stay focused on the task at hand survival.

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